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How did a four-word .COM sell for $100,000?

Morgan Linton Morgan Linton: I have to say I was pretty impressed with Uniregistry’s latest list of sales, with close to $30M in domain sales already this year it’s fair to say Uniregistry Market is on fire. A lot of the sales made perfect sense, one-word .COMs like Kombucha.com or Squeeze.com selling for six-figures is pretty darn normal. But […]

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Networks Are Not Cars Nor Cell Phones

CircleID CircleID: The network engineering world has long emphasized the longevity of the hardware we buy; I have sat through many vendor presentations where the salesman says "this feature set makes our product future proof! You can buy with confidence knowing this product will not need to be replaced for another ten years..." Over at the Networking Nerd, Tom has an article posted supporting this view of networking equipment, entitled Network Longevity: Think Car, not iPhone.

It seems, to me, that these concepts of longevity have the entire situation precisely backward. These ideas of "car length longevity" and "future proof hardware" are looking at the network from the perspective of an appliance, rather than from the perspective as a set of services. Let me put this in a little bit of context by considering two specific examples.

In terms of cars, I have owned four in the last 31 years. I owned a Jeep Wrangler for 13 years, a second Jeep Wrangler for eight years, and a third Jeep Wrangler for nine years. I have recently switched to a Jeep Cherokee, which I've just about reached my first year driving.

What if I bought network equipment like I buy cars? What sort of router was available nine years ago? That is 2008. I was still working at Cisco, and my lab, if I remember right, was made up of 7200's and 2600's. Younger engineers probably look at those model numbers and see completely different equipment than what I actually had; I doubt many readers of this blog ever deployed 7200's of the kind I had in my lab in their networks. Do I really want to run a network today on 9-year-old hardware? I don't see how the answer to that question can be "yes." Why?

First, do you really know what hardware capacity you will need in ten years? Really? I doubt your business leaders can tell you what products they will be creating in ten years beyond a general description, nor can they tell you how large the company will be, who their competitors will be, or what shifts might occur in the competitive landscape.

Hardware vendors try to get around this by building big chassis boxes and selling blades that will slide into them. But does this model really work? The Cisco 7500 was the current chassis box 9 years ago, I think — even if you could get blades for it today, would it meet your needs? Would you really want to pay the power and cooling for an old 7500 for 9 years because you didn't know if you would need one or seven slots nine years ago?

Building a hardware platform for ten years of service in a world where two years is too far to predict is like rearranging the chairs on the Titanic. It's entertaining, perhaps, but it's pretty pointless entertainment.

Second, why are we not taking the lessons of the compute and storage worlds into our thinking, and learning to scale out, rather than scaling up? We treat our routers like the server folks of yore — add another blade slot and make it go faster. Scale up makes your network do this —

Do you see those grey areas? They are costing you money. Do you enjoy defenestrating money?

These are symptoms of looking at the network as a bunch of wires and appliances, as hardware with a little side of software thrown in.

What about the software? Well, it may be hard to believe, but pretty much every commercial operating system available for routers today is an updated version of software that was available ten years ago. Some, in fact, are more than twenty years old. We don't tend to see this because we deploy routers and switches as appliances, which means we treat the software as just another form of hardware. We might deploy ten to fifteen different operating systems in our network without thinking about it — something we would never do in our data centers, or on our desktop computers.

So what this appliance-based way of looking at things emphasizes is this: buy enough hardware to last you ten years, and treat the software a fungible — software is a second tier player that is a simple enabler for the expensive bits, the hardware. The problem with this view of things is it simply ignores reality. We need to reverse our thinking.

Software is the actual core of the network, not hardware.

If you look at the entire networking space from a software centric perspective, you can think a lot differently. It doesn't matter what hardware you buy; what matters is what software it runs. This is the revolutionizing observation of white box, bright box, and disaggregated networking. Hardware is cheap, software is expensive. Hardware is CAPEX, software is OPEX. Hardware only loosely interacts with business and operations; software interacts with both.

The appliance model, and the idea of buying big iron like a car, is hampering the growth and usefulness of networks in real businesses. It is going to take a change to realize that most of us care much less about hardware than software in our daily lives, and to transfer this thinking to the network engineering realm.

It is time for a new way of looking at the network. A router is not a car, nor it is a cell phone. It is a router, and it deserves its own way of looking at value. The value is in connecting the software to the business, and the hardware to the speeds and feeds. These are separate problems which the appliance model ties into a single "thing." This makes the appliance world bad for businesses, bad for network design, and bad for network engineers.

It's time to rethink the way we look at network engineering to build networks that are better for business, to adjust our idea of future proof to mean a software-based system that can be used across many generations of hardware, while hardware becomes a "just in time" component used and recycled as needs must.
Written by Russ White, Network Architect at LinkedInFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Networks

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AUCTION RECAP OF SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

Domain Shane Domain Shane: A comprehensive look at the final auction prices, closeouts and more from the auction list posted on September 20, 2017. 
If there is an asterisk (*) next to a price, it means that the name was at auction from a private seller (rather than an expiring name) and may have had a reserve.  I’m only showing where the price was when the auction ended, but the name may not have sold if a reserve was in place.
Save Money With Daddy Bulk Domain Registration
Dropcatch and Sedo Names at Auction
CAN.com  My favorite name is back up for auction
At $15,000 with 7 days left
CrowdMate.com   Basically Tinder
$664
BrightDeal.com  I like bright names.  So does Namebright
$230
Namejet

Top 10 Namejet sales for yesterday as listed on Namebio.
openenergy.com $4,988
trackmate.com $4,777
oib.net $1,910
lawyers.biz $1,600
665222.com $1,500
29935.com $1,413
25972.com $1,310
27826.com $1,309
thkx.com $1,300
d5y.com $1,131

The post AUCTION RECAP OF SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 appeared first on DSAD.

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Mother Is Screaming: 3 Category 4 Storms in One Season; 5 Earthquakes in 2 Days!

The Frager Factor The Frager Factor: We’re back! (Please no more hurricanes as Trump would say we need to ban bad weather until we figure out what's going on!) Petrodollar Under Attack; What makes people willing to pay for news online? The first autonomous drone delivery network will fly above Switzerland; Petrodollar Under Attack; This Mindset Will Change The Way You Negotiate; Imagination at war with Apple over iPhone chips;

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SSL comes to landing page tools, but at a price

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: Services that make it easy to create landing pages across multiple domains need to implement SSL. Next month is the deadline for most sites to move to https with an SSL certificate. At that point, Google’s Chrome browser will give a “not secure” warning when someone visits a page with any type of form. This […]
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Mike Robertson returns to Fabulous!

OnlineDomain.com OnlineDomain.com: Mike Robertson is returning to Fabulous, the Australian domain name registrar, after nearly 7 years. Mike will be permanently joining the Fabulous team in mid/late October 2017 at which time more news about Fabulous may come out. The news came from an email Fabulous sent out to customers today: “As you may be aware, there …
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Domain Movers: HVM.com, PureForce.com + More

dotWeekly dotWeekly: This is Domain Movers. We keep track of company related domain name transactions, well, because it’s important and you learn from these!
To note, I have been struggling lately detecting movements. I heavily rely on DomainTools and one of the tools I use is called Registrant Monitoring. I monitor several specific corporate focused companies and the monitor allows me to see “movement”. In general, most movement/changes in whois records mean little to nothing. It’s my job to detect the ones … Read the rest
Domain Movers: HVM.com, PureForce.com + MoreJamie Zoch

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4 domain name registration myths debunked: Getting a domain name doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive

DomainPulse.com DomainPulse.com: The internet is generally the first place people look for information on just about everything. That’s why when you register a domain name, or several, it’s an important step for...

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DotEUS Registry Writes to ICANN in Solidarity with PuntCat

InternetNews.me InternetNews.me: The situation in Barcelona and the .cat registry is still developing. One of the other gTLD registries based in Spain .eus, which is aimed at the Basque language and culture, has come out in solidarity with .cat. In a letter addressed to ICANN CEO Göran Marby the CEO of .EUS Josu Waliño raises concerns about […]
DotEUS Registry Writes to ICANN in Solidarity with PuntCat was published originally on Domain Industry & Internet News - Domain Name Industry News

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Una extensión sin ánimo de lucro: .care

Blog Dominios Blog Dominios: Imagen: www.namecheap.com Las buenas acciones sociales y solidarias no podían quedarse sin extensión propia, y por ello nace el dominio .care. Se trata de un novedoso recurso que se puede emplear en multitud de ámbitos y está especialmente indicado, como señalábamos con anterioridad, para aquellos particulares o instituciones sin ánimo de lucro que presten cualquier tipo de atención; pues si lo traducimos del inglés significa “caridad”. Desde el punto de vista técnico, ésta extensión soporta caracteres IDN y whois privados para preservar la intimidad del titular del dominio. La longitud de esta extensión debe oscilar entre 1 y 63 caracteres, por lo que existe la posibilidad de optar por un nombre que se ajuste sin problemas a como quieras ser conocido en la red. No precisa de requisitos de residencia ni técnicos específicos; siendo inmediatos, aunque algunos nombres podrían ser premium y el coste incrementarse. Se trata de un dominio muy interesante como todos los temas relacionados con ámbitos sociales.

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