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Dot-Com is Still King – of Domain Name Disputes

CircleID CircleID: Despite the launch of more than 1,200 new gTLDs, .com remains far and away the most popular top-level domain involved in domain name disputes.

In 2016, .com domain names represented 66.82 percent of all gTLD disputes at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the only domain name dispute provider that publishes real-time statistics. And, as of this writing, the rate is even higher so far in 2017, with .com domain names accounting for 69.78 percent of all disputes.

Not surprisingly, the overall trend since the launch of the new gTLDs shows .com appearing in a smaller percentage of cases under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP). For example, in 2012, when the new gTLD applications were unveiled, .com domain names represented 74.84 percent of all gTLD disputes at WIPO.

Of course, some new gTLDs are appearing in UDRP cases, with 13 new gTLDs represented in 10 or more UDRP cases at WIPO in 2016:

.xyz
.top
.club
.online
.vip
.store
.website
.cloud
.site
.space
.shop
.lol
.date
But, the discrepancy between .com disputes and others is tremendous (as the chart above shows): WIPO saw 3,120 .com domain names in dispute proceedings last year, but the most-commonly disputed new gTLD — .xyz — appeared only 321 times.

As I've written before, the large number of new gTLDs probably contributed to a record number of UDRP disputes in 2016. But it's clear that new gTLDs are accounting for relatively few disputes.

Trying to understand why new gTLDs don't appear in more UDRP proceedings is pure speculation, though a couple of explanations seem reasonable:

New gTLD registrations account for a small percentage of all domain names. While there were 329.3 million total domain name registrations (with .com accounting for 126.9 million of those) as of the end of 2016, there are currently fewer than 29 million new gTLD registrations. Therefore, there is simply a relatively small number of gTLD registrations that could be subject to a dispute.
Trademark owners care more about .com domain name registrations and how they are being used. While new gTLDs are bothersome to many trademark owners, their limited appeal makes them less important to dispute.Written by Doug Isenberg, Attorney & Founder of The GigaLaw FirmFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cybersquatting, Domain Names, Top-Level Domains

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.Art will have 3.5 million premium domain names

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: Good luck finding a new .art domain at “regular” registration prices. This headline is not a typo. The .art domain name, which will enter general availability on May 10, will have a staggering 3.5 million domain names that will be available for registration at prices higher than standard. Standard retail prices should be about $15-$20. […]
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New Chapter Working Groups Open Closed Doors

CircleID CircleID: One thing was clear from a recent presentation by the new leaders of the SF-Bay Internet Society (ISOC) Chapter Working Groups: inclusion and collaboration will be the key to these groups' success.

As Dr. Brandie Nonnecke, the Internet Governance Working Group (WG) Chair said, "We haven't yet cracked the code on what 'multistakeholder' means." But that won't stop her and Dr. Jaclyn Kerr, the Data Protection, Privacy, and Security WG Chair, from trying. At a recent Chapter Event held on April 10th, 2017, these two innovative leaders laid out an ambitious plan to bridge silos and foster open dialogue in order to work towards the Internet Society's mission that the Internet is for Everyone.

Focus Areas

These newly-launched Working Groups will focus on the interest areas of the SF Bay Area Chapter members, as determined by their responses to a recent survey. There are three in total: Internet Governance; Data Protection, Privacy & Security; and Internet of Things (IoT), Internet Technologies & Access.

Internet Governance

For the Internet Governance Working Group, Chair Brandie Nonnecke laid out a plan that includes supporting interdisciplinary research, publishing position papers and policy briefs, organizing workshops, symposia, and activities, and supporting a fellowship programme. The goal is to educate and engage stakeholders not traditionally involved in Internet governance. Brandie is well-suited to achieve this goal: she is a PhD whose research focuses on multistakeholderism in internet governance and information and communication technology (ICT) policymaking at the Center of Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) and the Banatao Institute, UC Berkeley. The WG group is now accepting members; help drive the agenda by applying to join the WG.

Data, Privacy, Security

For the Data Protection, Privacy, and Security Working Group, Chair Jaclyn Kerr discussed the urgency of this issue: due to government surveillance and data breaches, there are serious threats to our online security and privacy. Even at the top level of government, there have been security breaches. Jaclyn discussed working in collaboration with the other WGs and fostering discussion between those involved in tech, civil society, civil liberties, security and academia. Jaclyn is as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Global Security Research (CGSR), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where her research focuses on cybersecurity and information security strategy, Internet governance, and the Internet policies of non-democratic regimes. Apply to join this WG.

IoT

And last but not least, in the IoT, Internet Technologies & Access Working Group, the focus will be on the IoT ecosystem, issues around access, critical Internet infrastructure, innovation and open standards. As more and more devices connect to the Internet, we need to ensure that security concerns, critical resources like IPv4 and IPv6 address space, and technology standards are addressed. Mischa Spiegelmock, who unfortunately could not attend the Chapter Event due to travel, chairs this WG. Mischa is software engineer who currently leads an engineering team at MVS Technical Group Inc., and specializes in information security, database-driven applications, systems programming, UNIX and C. To get involved, apply to join this working group.

Opening Doors

So many decisions about Internet governance, security, and infrastructure happen behind closed doors. The more technical the topic is, the more difficult it is for everyday citizens to get involved, which is a vulnerability for all of us. These Working Groups, the SF-Bay Area Chapter and the Internet Society exist to change that. "The Internet touches every part of our lives and everyone should be equipped with enough knowledge to enable them to have a say in how it is run," says SF-Bay Area Chapter President and Chair, Susannah Gray. "The SF-Bay Area Chapter provides a neutral platform for you to advocate, learn, educate, and work on these key issues. It was amazing to see so many people come together on April 10 to express their interest, their own areas of focus and their concerns for the future of the Internet: we look forward to working with you all as we continue to build up our Working Groups."

Get Involved

Get involved today by joining us and almost 2,000 other members (it's free!), emailing us with your thoughts, applying for open board seats, volunteering, donating, sponsoring the Chapter, or joining one of these powerful Working Groups. There is a reason Board Treasurer Ken Krechmer, one of the Chapter founders, called ISOC the "Continental congress of the Internet." This is the basis for an open Internet.

You can find the agenda from the April 10 Chapter Event and recording here.

This blog post was written by Jenna Spagnolo on behalf of the San Francisco-Bay Area Internet Society chapter.
Written by Jenna SpagnoloFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Access Providers, Broadband, Censorship, Internet Governance, Internet of Things, Malware, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation, Privacy, Security, Web

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Over 800 Startups Send Letter to Pai: Focus Instead on Policies for Stronger Internet for Everyone

CircleID CircleID: The coalition led by Engine, Y Combinator, and Techstars, along with over 800 tech startups sent a letter to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai urging him to focus "on policies that would promote a stronger Internet for everyone," rather than dismantling the existing net neutrality framework. On Wednesday, Pai gave a stern speech in Washington about his intent to reverse rules that boosted government regulatory powers over Internet service providers: "this is a fight that we intend to wage." The letter sent to Pai argues: “Without net neutrality, the incumbents who provide access to the Internet would be able to pick winners or losers in the market." ... "We are concerned by reports that you would replace this system with a set of minimum voluntary commitments, which would give a green light for Internet access providers to discriminate in unforeseen ways. Rather than dismantling regulations that allow the startup ecosystem to thrive, we urge you to focus instead on policies that would promote a stronger Internet for everyone." The full letter is posted on the Engine website.
Follow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Access Providers, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation

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AUCTION RECAP OF APRIL 26, 2017

Domain Shane Domain Shane: A comprehensive look at the final auction prices, closeouts and more from the auction list posted on April 26, 2017. 
If there is an asterisk (*) next to a price, it means that the name was at auction from a private seller (rather than an expiring name) and may have had a reserve.  I’m only showing where the price was when the auction ended, but the name may not have sold if a reserve was in place.
Save Money With Daddy Bulk Domain Registration
Sedo Great Domains Auction
EGSN.com    Met reserve at $265.  Worth a bit more than that IMO
$460
Food.House    Kudus to Sedo for putting the renewal price on the auction.  No reserve
At zero with a day left

Namejet
Top 10 Namejet sales for yesterday as listed on Namebio.
educationlaw.com $7,558
zety.com $2,300
organicgreen.com $1,812
yourhair.com $1,655
outdoorspa.com $1,620
screenrepairs.com $1,600
charity.tv $1,500
ni88.com $1,498
bqpq.com $1,300
pyxx.com $1,290

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Silicon Valley’s Secret: I’d Pay You $500,000 a Year, but You Can’t Do the Work; “The Retail Bubble Has Now Burst”

The Frager Factor The Frager Factor: Brutal But Powerful Lessons People Often Learn Too Late in Life; Hitachi built an AI security system that follows you through a crowd; Medicaid Could Have Saved $1 Billion If Medical Marijuana Was Legalized; 9 Incredible Countries Where You Can Live for Under $1,000 a Month; Meet a new breed of hipsters: flipsters, millennials who flip homes; How to Prevent “Move Fast and Break Things” From

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Sorry, Not Sorry: WHOIS Data Must Remain Public

CircleID CircleID: In March, I posted a call to action to those of us in the community who have the inclination to fight against a movement to redact information critical to anti-abuse research. Today, I felt compelled to react to some of the discussions on the ICANN discussion list dedicated to the issue of WHOIS reform:

Sorry, not sorry: I work every working hour of the day to protect literally hundreds of millions of users from privacy violating spam, phish, malware, and support scams.

Should access to WHOIS data be redacted in any way beyond what it is at present, my work will be made impossible. I spend 90% of my day in WHOIS data, the other 10% sculpting the data in a manner to provide reason and proof to hosting provider and registrars to take action against real-life criminals on their networks.

I also prepare cases for law enforcement to act upon. Contrary to popular belief in some quarters, LE cannot possibly begin to know about the stuff I (and my many, many colleagues) see until we tell them. That's how it works. Any of the big botnet and crime ring take-downs and arrests you've ever seen have involved a public-private collaboration between individuals, researchers such as myself, and law enforcement.

So, I'd like to issue congratulations to all those who want to redact. You will, without a single iota of uncertainty, will expose many more people to real — not potential or hypothetical — privacy issues of a far more serious nature than you could possibly imagine, all in the badly mangled, misguided, and muddleheaded notion of what privacy actually is in the real world. 'Cut off your nose to spite your face' has never been more apt.

I hope you tell your Mom, family and your friends what you are trying to do here, while I spend my time trying to protect them from real evil: Revenge porn. Identity Theft. Plain old theft. Stalking. Photographic representation of the rape of children. Trolling, leading to the destruction of people's lives. Emptied bank accounts.

Tell them you don't want me to be able to do my job, and that you are trying to make it impossible, because you think access to the data that has been public and without challenge under the world's privacy laws for twenty years is better off limited to the point of uselessness, sacrificed on some misshapen altar of privacy.

If I sound angry at what you are attempting to do, then I've hit my mark. I am furious. The security sector is furious. We are terrified that you may have any degree of success in this regard, because you apparently don't know, or don't care what the actual results will be. Placating with 'gated access' means there will be some among my peers and colleagues, far more talented and effective than I, who simply cannot gain access, and the resulting mess will be on your head, and at risk of overstating my case, the blood on your hands.

So again, congratulations. Mother's Day is coming up. Be sure to make mention of this in the card you send. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'll go back to diving in the data lake of WHOIS, trying to keep spam and far worse evil off've your network.

K bye tnx.

Neil Schwartzman

Executive Director

Coalition Against Unsolicited Commercial Email

http://cauce.org

Twitter : @cauce
Written by Neil Schwartzman, Executive Director, The Coalition Against unsolicited Commercial Email - CAUCEFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime, DDoS, DNS, Security, Spam, Whois

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I can’t believe it’s not RDNH

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: It’s difficult to understand how this case isn’t reverse domain name hijacking. Perhaps it’s time I start a recurring column on Domain Name Wire called “I can’t believe it’s not RDNH!” There are quite a few UDRPs that sure seem like reverse domain name hijacking but panelists decline to find it. They often give generic […]
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WHX.com leads Sedo Great Domains auction that ends today

Domain Name Wire Domain Name Wire: Three letter domain name is top bid-getter so far. Sedo’s monthly Great Domains auction ends today at noon EDT. As of 9 am EDT this morning, the auction is led by the three-letter domain name WHX.com. It has met its reserve and it currently $24,000. The domain name has been under Whois privacy since 2013. […]
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