What Does the Future Hold for the Internet?

CircleID CircleID: Explore the interactive 2017 Global Internet Report: Paths to Our Digital FutureThis is the fundamental question that the Internet Society is posing through the report just launched today, our 2017 Global Internet Report: Paths to Our Digital Future.

The report is a window into the diverse views and perspectives of a global community that cares deeply about how the Internet will evolve and impact humanity over the next 5-7 years. We couldn't know what we would find when we embarked on the journey to map what stakeholders believe could shape the future of the Internet, nor can we truly know what will happen to the Internet, but we do now have a sense of what we need to think about today to help shape the Internet of tomorrow. The report reflects the views and aspirations of our community as well as some of the most pressing challenges facing the future of this great innovation.

What have we learned? We've learned that our community remains confident that the core Internet values that gave rise to the Internet remain valid. We also heard very strong worries that the user-centric model of the Internet is under extraordinary pressure from governments, from technology giants, and even from the technology itself. There is a sense that there are forces beyond the users' control that may define the Internet's future. That the user may no longer be at the center of the Internet's path.

It is, perhaps, trite to say that the world is more connected today than ever before. Indeed, we are only beginning to understand the implications of a hyperconnected society that is dependent on the generation, collection and movement of data in ways that many do not fully understand. The Internet of the future will most certainly enable a host of products and services that could revolutionize our daily lives. At the same time, our dependence on the technology raises a myriad of challenges that society may be ill-equipped to address.

Clearly, the Internet is increasingly intertwined with a geopolitical environment that feels uncertain and even precarious. The Internet provides governments with both opportunities to better the lives of their people but also tools for surveillance and even control. This report highlights the serious choices we all must make about how to ensure that rights and freedoms prevail in the Internet of the future. The decisions we make will determine whether humanity remains in the drivers' seat of technology or not.

In short, the decisions we make about the Internet can no longer be seen as "separate", as "over there" — the implications of a globally interconnected world will be felt by all of us. And the decisions we make about the Internet will be felt far and wide. We are still just beginning to understand the implications of a globally connected society and what it will mean for individuals, business, government and society at large.

How we address the opportunities and challenges that today's forces of change are creating for the future is paramount, but one thing above all others is certain — the choices are ours alone to make, and the future we want is up to us to shape.

Explore the interactive 2017 Global Internet Report: Paths to Our Digital Future
Written by Sally Shipman Wentworth, VP of Global Policy Development, Internet SocietyFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Broadband, Censorship, Cybersecurity, Internet Governance, Internet Protocol, Mobile Internet, Networks, Policy & Regulation, Privacy, Web

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GoDaddy Auctions is removing some domains listed for sale in your account

TheDomains TheDomains: A reader sent in the following email they received from GoDaddy. Apparently certain new gtld extensions cannot be made for sale on the auction platform at GoDaddy. All the strings removed belong to Uniregistry. Dear Sir or Madam: Due to a backend change on our end, your domain listings for any domain ending in the […]
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Top Topics: The Best Landing Page Example; Is It Time to Sell Four-Letter .COM’s?…

NamePros NamePros: In this week's edition of Top Topics, we take a look at one investor's ten most recent domain sales and we ask is it now time to sell your four-letter .COM's? Elsewhere, a domainer is looking for examples of excellent landing pages and we feature an interesting poll asking you to reveal your own annual budget for buying domain names.

My 10 Most Recently Sold...

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Google Global Cache Servers Go Online in Cuba, But App Engine Blocked

CircleID CircleID: I had hoped to get more information before publishing this post, but difficult Internet access in Cuba and now the hurricane got in the way — better late than never.

Cuban requests for Google services are being routed to GCC servers in Cuba, and all Google services that are available in Cuba are being cached — not just YouTube. That will cut latency significantly, but Cuban data rates remain painfully slow. My guess is that Cubans will notice the improved performance in interactive applications, but maybe not perceive much of a change when watching a streaming video.

Note the italics in the above paragraph — evidently, Google blocks access to their App Engine hosting and application development platform. Cuban developers cannot build App Engine applications, and Cubans cannot access applications like the Khan Academy or Google's G-Suite.

The last time I checked, Rackspace and Amazon allow access to their hosting platforms from Cuba, but IBM Softlayer and Google did not. President Obama clearly favored improved telecommunication for Cuba, in his Cuba Policy Changes, stating:

"I've authorized increased telecommunications connections between the United States and Cuba. Businesses will be able to sell goods that enable Cubans to communicate with the United States and other countries."

While Trump claimed that he was "canceling the last administration's completely one-sided deal with Cuba," he made few changes and has said nothing about restrictions on access to Internet services by Cubans.

I wonder why IBM and Google do not follow the lead of Amazon and Rackspace.
Written by Larry Press, Professor of Information Systems at California State UniversityFollow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Access Providers, Broadband, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Web

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