Russian Interference More Vigorous than Assumed, Over 39 States Targeted During Election

CircleID CircleID: "Voter databases and software systems in an overwhelming number of states — 39 to be exact — were targeted by Russian cyberattacks over the summer and fall of 2016," Allegra Kirkland reporting today in TPM. "That number, and Bloomberg’s revelation that hackers attempted to delete or alter voter data in Illinois and successfully accessed a campaign finance database in another state, indicates that Russian’s election interference was even more vigorous than has previously been reported. ... Russian meddling involved not only the strategic hacking and distribution of campaign communications, but efforts to interfere with America’s election infrastructure."
Follow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cyberattack, Cybersquatting

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AUCTION RECAP OF JUNE 12, 2017

Domain Shane Domain Shane: A comprehensive look at the final auction prices, closeouts and more from the auction list posted on June 12, 2017. 
If there is an asterisk (*) next to a price, it means that the name was at auction from a private seller (rather than an expiring name) and may have had a reserve.  I’m only showing where the price was when the auction ended, but the name may not have sold if a reserve was in place.
Save Money With Daddy Bulk Domain Registration
SEDO Auctions
TMR.com   Closes today and met reserve.
$32,999
Get.in     Half call to action half hack.  And short.  Reserve range is wide so may be getting close
$3,800
Big.in    Met reserve.   Everone loves big, some like HUGE
$4,999
VRDD.com   Virtual reality with busty women?  Yeah, may be a stretch
At $751 with 10 hours left

Namejet
Top 10 Namejet sales for yesterday as listed on Namebio.
67755.com $7,058
58853.com $4,999
visualizing.org $4,500
stenographer.com $1,996
swapcoin.com $1,851
circlegroup.com $1,544
nnp.org $1,010
hrfr.com $1,007
kpsf.com $1,007
nwdn.com $1,003

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How to change your cPanel password

Whats Your Name Whats Your Name: Forgot your cPanel password to manage your website’s hosting? Follow these simple steps to reset your password and regain access to your account. Start by logging into you Name.com account. Once you’re in, click the Web Hosting link under My Account. Scroll down to the bottom of your Web Hosting dashboard to the link that […]
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.Club is releasing 4,500 new premium domain names

OnlineDomain.com OnlineDomain.com: On June 14th at 15:00 UTC, .Club will be releasing 4,500 NEW premium domain names into their tiered premium inventory at the registrars. These are predominantly names that were previously registry reserved and have never been available through the registrar channel before. In addition to many keyword domains, the release includes approximately 1,200 2, 3 and 4 character names. …
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Related Articles:
.Club Just Released 12,000 Premium Domains
.Club To Release More Premium Domains On June 16
9,300 new .CLUB premium names released tomorrow

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Forget traffic leakage. It’s email that’s most dangerous

A lost website visitor is one thing; a misdirected email can be worse. Domain name investors often talk about the traffic leakage that occurs when you use a domain name other than .com (or the dominant domain in your country). Use something other than .com and some visitors will inevitably end up going to the […]

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How to Internet: Pay Attention to Domains

I Want My Name I Want My Name: Timo sent me an article yesterday about how to protect brands from identity theft online – it’s a good post that says all that needs to be said on that particular topic. But the sequel should be how to identify bad actors as a consumer (brands can only do so much).
I see it all the time – “Why did “BAD THING” happen when I clicked on this link?” “Well, Mom, a real Apple email won’t be riddled with typos and low-res images, and it won’t come from appl3helper.biz.”
I could go on and on about things to look out for from a content standpoint, but as a domain registrar, I feel it’s my duty to remind people to pay attention to domains.
Tip 1: The proof is in the email address: If you look at an email, the very first thing you’ll see is the sender. It often just has a name or brand name, but if you click on it you’ll see the full sender email address. And in an email address, everything after the @ is the domain name.
Why should you care? Well, if you’re banking with Wells Fargo and get an email from an @wellsfargo.com email address, you’re probably fine. But if you get an official-looking Wells Fargo email from an @hotmail.com address, it’s 100% fake. Wells Fargo, being a large corporate entity, will never send messages from a Hotmail account, even if it’s wellsfargo@hotmail.com. Same goes with Apple Support or the IRS… if it’s not from @apple.com or @IRS.gov, it’s not real. Don’t respond to ask if it’s real – just delete it.
Tip 2: Don’t believe your eyes
“Did you see that Putin invaded Alaska?!” Hmm, so the BBC logo looks right, and all the branding looks right… but wait. Why is the URL bbcnewsreal.loan?
Well, Dad, the internet doesn’t exactly work like a city. There aren’t regulations and zoning laws to determine what buildings get created and what buildings don’t. If some guy wants to create a fake news site that looks just like the BBC, it’s really up to you not to get duped (the BBC can take steps to take it down, but sometimes a flood is hard to contain). So check the domain – copying a design is easy, but posting something on a domain you don’t own isn’t. If the site says BBC, the domain should be BBC.com.
Tip 3: Don’t feed the animals
Here’s the biggest tip of all – if you know you’re on a site that’s fake, don’t click on anything! Seriously, if you accidentally type in economst.com instead of economist.com and you stumble upon a link that says it’ll take you to “where you want to go,” just close the page and type in the domain correctly.
No matter how nice the page looks, you really don’t know what’s on the other side of those links. And even if the link does point you in the right direction, rewarding typosquatters with traffic is just rewarding sneaky behavior. Don’t do it!

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